Archive for the ‘Posted by Greg Ver Steeg’ Category

Consider a little science experiment we’ve all done, to find out if a switch controls a light. How many data points does it usually take to convince you? Not many! Even if you didn’t do a randomized trial yourself, and observed somebody else manipulating the switch you’d figure it out pretty quickly. This type of […]


The Grue language doesn’t have words for “blue” or “green”. Instead Grue speakers have the following concepts: grue: green during the day and blue at night bleen: blue during the day and green at night (This example is adapted from the original grue thought experiment.) To us, these concepts seem needlessly complicated. However, to a […]


The work with Shirley Pepke on using CorEx to find patterns in gene expression data is finally published in BMC Medical Genomics. Shirley wrote a blog post about it as well. She will present this work at the Harvard Precision Medicine conference and we’ll both present at Berkeley’s Data Edge conference. The code we used for the paper […]


Edit: Also check out the story by the Washington Post and on cancer.gov. Shirley is a collaborator of mine who works on using gene expression data to get a better understanding of ovarian cancer. She has a remarkable personal story that is featured in a podcast about our work together. I laughed, I cried, I can’t recommend […]


Here’s one way to solve a problem. (1) Visualize what a good solution would look like. (2) Quantify what makes that solution “good”. (3) Search over all potentials solutions for one that optimizes the goodness. I like working on this whole pipeline, but I have come to the realization that I have been spending too much […]


Here are the slides from my talk yesterday at ICML. The information sieve is introduced in this paper. But in this followup paper, we make it really practical and demonstrate the connections to “common information”. The code is on github for the discrete and continuous versions.


This one is just for fun. There’s no deeper meaning, just a failed experiment that resulted in some cool looking pictures.